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3 DayS Best of Istanbul Private Tour by walking

Price per person : $40.00

Tours Detail

  • Day 1 : Hagia Sophia, Blue Mosque, Hipporome, Topkapi Palace, and the Grand Bazaar
 
Explore the highlights of Istanbul on this full-day walking tour that covers the major attractions, such as the Hagia Sophia Museum, the iconic Blue Mosque, the bustling maze of the Grand Bazaar, and the obelisk of the Hippodrome of Constantinople.
 
The 8-hour excursion starts with a pickup from your Istanbul hotel and a walk through the lively streets of Turkey’s largest city to visit the dramatic former basilica of the Hagia Sophia, a great architectural beauty and an important monument during the Byzantine and Ottoman Empires. For many centuries, this was the largest church in the world, and it still boasts the 4th largest dome after St. Paul's in London, St. Peter's in Rome, and the Duomo in Florence. Dedicated to the Hagia Sophia or 'divine wisdom', it is one of the greatest surviving examples of Byzantine architecture.
 
Move on to the Blue Mosque, more officially known as the "Sultanahmet" Mosque. The mosque’s striking blue tiles give it its more common name and make it one of Istanbul’s most iconic attractions. Located close to Topkapi Palace, Sultanahmet Mosque was considered the Supreme Imperial Mosque in Istanbul.
 
Continue to Topkapi Palace, a relic of the glory days of the great Ottoman Empire. The former palace boasted a population of about 4,000 people at its peak and was home to 25 sultans over a period of 400 years. Located on a promontory overlooking the Golden Horn, it sits in tranquil gardens that provide shade from the blazing heat of the summer. Pop in to the museum to see the gorgeous Iznik tiles and the ornate stateroom of the harem, among other attractions.
 
You will also visit the Hippodrome, the former circus built in 203 AD by the Roman Emperor Septimus Severus. Three monuments from the original building remain, including the Egyptian Obelisk, the Serpentine Column, and the Constantine Column. You will also pause to look at the German Fountain of Wilhelm II, made from 8 marble columns.
 
Your day won’t be complete, however, without a visit to the Grand Bazaar, one of the largest and oldest covered markets in the world. With hundreds of small handcraft shops selling everything from handmade carpets to Turkish coffee, the atmosphere is electric, and it's a great place to try out your bargaining skills.
 
  • Day 2: Spice Bazaar, Bosphorus cruise, Dolmabahce Palace, Istiklal Street, and Taksim
The spice bazaar is located in Fatih. It's known as the Egyptian Market because during the Ottoman period, Egyptian exports were sold there. The Bosphorus is a narrow, navigable strait between Europe and Asia that connects the Black Sea to the Marmara Sea. Rumeli and Anadolu Fortresses are located at the narrowest point of Bosphorus. There are also magnificent Ottoman palaces and mosques along the Bosphorus. Keep an eye out for them.
 
Built in the 19th century, Dolmabahce Palace was the administrative center of the Ottoman Empire and housed some of the last Ottoman Sultans. The palace site was created by filling in the small bay on the Bosphorus. This gave rise to its name — in Turkish, Dolma means 'filled' or 'stuffed,' and bahce means 'garden'.
 
Istiklal Street is brimming with life. There, you'll find a plethora of shops, restaurants, and bars. From there, it is then a 2-kilometer walk down to the Tunel Galata Tower area.
  • Day 3 : Süleymaniye mosque  , Chora Church  , Fener District  Balat District, Pierre Loti Hill
Suleymaniye Mosque is the largest mosque in Istanbul and is as impressive on the inside as it is on the outside. In the garden behind the mosque, the terrace offers lovely views of the Golden Horn and Bosphorus.
Chora Church; considered to be one of the most beautiful examples of a Byzantine church. With its glorious mosaics and frescoes about the scenes of the Holy Bible she holds an important place.
Fener District; Continue exploring Istanbul’s rich religious history with a stop at the Church of St. George. Since the 1600s, the church has been the location of the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople and is recognized as the spiritual leader of the Eastern Orthodox Religion.
Balat District; lines of drying laundry stretch across steep, winding streets. Century-old Ottoman houses lean against each other in a combination of reds, blues and greens. And art galleries and design shops dot the area along the water.
Pierre Loti Hill and Cable Car is one of the most popular sights to visit since it offers great views for the visitors. Take the cable car to reach to the top and enjoy the beautiful scenery while sipping your Turkish coffee or tea

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